Tag Archives: events

Follow the Buffalo Benefit Concert!

Please join us on December 5th for the 4th annual Follow the Buffalo benefit concert!  This is an evening of family-friendly entertainment, featuring live music, performances, and a silent auction with many unique items donated by local artists.  All proceeds will go to Follow the Buffalo, Inc. and will be used to fund youth camp scholarships.

When: December 5th, from 6 – 10 pm

Where: Old Dog Tavern, 402 E. Kalamazoo Ave., Kalamazoo, MI

This year the event will feature performances by Joe Reilly, Tom Duffield, Aaron Young, Ira Cohen, and others.  In addition, Jeff Brazda, board president, will speak about Follow the Buffalo, Inc. and our work with the Pine Ridge community.

Please visit the event page on Facebook for a full schedule and more details!

Watch the video below to hear “Wishless” by Joe Reilly!

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Invitation to see Nobel Laureate Shirin Ebadi

The government and coporate interests of the U.S. are in a dispute with the government and corporate interests of Iran.  We are led to believe that the people of Iran are different from us, that their beliefs and attitudes are a danger to us.  The Iranian people have been told that the U.S. is the great satan.
From the perspective of the Creator we are just squabbling siblings.  Unfortunately, the division between us effects billions of people. Continue reading

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Living in Balance + Coyote Life Festival Reminder

Hau Kolas,
 
Just back from a morning walk on a beautiful, wintery morning.  Even in February the birds sing to each other, announcing our presence.  The deer flash their white tails as they dash for deeper cover.  A bumpy trail in the snow reveals the tunnel of a hungry rodent looking for something good to eat.  Footprint trails of many kinds including turkey, racoon, squirrels and rabbits mark the comings and goings of our brothers and sisters who roam the Winter forest.  At this time of year, you can hear the howls and yips of the coyotes echoing in the night.  The females are calling for mates.  When the woods are healthy, full with a diversity of plants and animals, the coyotes know its a good time to bring pups into the world. 
 
A little over 80 years ago we the people passed a law called the Animal Damage Control Act.  The intention of this law was to reduce the damage to farms and homes caused by wild creatures.  We now call the agency created by that law the Department of Wildlife Services.  The service this agency provides is to kill over 2,000,000 ‘nuisance’ animals every year at a cost of more than $100,000,000 annually.  Especially hated among the animals are the predators bears, mountain lions, wolves and coyote.  They represent about 150,000 of the animals killed each year and the coyote about 90,000 of those. 
 
We have spent billions of dollars killing animals under the Animal Damage Control Act.  We have employed methods of killing that many find inhumane such as poisoning, snares that strangle, and traps that maim and slowly kill their victims.  What have we gained from these practices?  Farmers and ranchers still complain that predation threatens their livelihood.  Coyotes and other predators are expanding their ranges even into the cities.  Scientists who study the relationship between predators, humans and the environment are coming to better understand the effects of the Animal Damage Control Act.  Using the coyote as an example, they have learned that efforts to exterminate them have very little benefit.  In cases where short term kill methods have been used, by that they mean projects lasting less than 6 months, coyote migration will replace the population within 3 months of the end of the project.  Longer term kill methods have been able to hold down the coyote population, but have resulted in an imbalance in the ecosystem that leads to an overabundance of animals that compete with livestock animals for forage.  The loss of forage reduces the capacity of ranchland to support livestock to a degree greater than that caused by predation.  The loss of a top predator like the coyote also leads to a simplification of the ecosystem.  Once they are removed, a rash of extinctions occurs among the other animals.  Biodiversity is lost and the stability of the ecosystem is threatened.  The scientists are coming to understand what the native people had observed in the days before science.  Coyote and predators in general serve an important role in maintaining the balance and health of the ecosystem.  Their presence improves the health and abundance of all forms of life. 
 
We as a nation must learn how to live in balance with the coyote and other predators.  Our old policies are based on fear and greed.  Actual studies of predation on livestock show that it is both less common and less costly than what has been portrayed.  Alternative methods of dealing with the problem of predation are showing promise.  Marin County in California has discontinued their contract with Wildlife Services, opting instead for programs that protect livestock with improved fencing, guard dogs and compensation to farmers for lost livestock.  These methods have proven to be not only more effective, but also less expensive. 
 
The perceived struggle between the predators and the farmers is a reflection of the struggle faced by all of us in a modern society.  Our desire to control and consume the Earth for profit without regard for the consequences of our choices is proving to be unsustainable.  We are damaging the health and wholesomeness of our environment.  The quality of our life and the lives of our future generations will suffer if we do not learn to live in harmony with all our relations.
 
The Coyote Life Festival is not just a protest against the extermination of coyote, it is also a celebration of the value of the coyote and honoring the important role it plays in maintaining balance and health for all of us.  Please join us in celebrating all life Friday, Feb 22nd through Sunday, Feb 24th.   Email tim@healinglifeways.org if you have questions about lodging, directions, or what to bring with you for this weekend of celebration.

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Happy New Year

Wakan Yeja – Sacred One

Babies-007

In Lakota they call their infants Wakan Yeja – Sacred Ones.  Babies were believed to choose their families.  And the babies were loved, cherished and cared for not only by their parents, but also their Tiospaye – extended families.

In Western culture we often describe the New Year as a baby.  We might imagine that baby has chosen this time and all of us to be his or her family.  We might envision not one baby, but the babies of all the different races and cultures as being part of our human family, all needing and deserving of our love and care.

What kind of world could we create if we understood all new life on the earth to be our family?

This is the medicine we can choose to cultivate in this New Year and new era.  There is a growing awareness of our interconnection and interdependence.  Our intentions and actions can add momentum to this shift.  If you want this, if you feel this, use this awareness to guide both your big and small life choices.  Be the change you wish to see.

We do ceremony to connect with the Creator and to come into harmony with all of creation.

We will have a special meeting with the board of Follow the Buffalo and anyone who wants to participate in upcoming events we hope to host to support our work to assist people on the reservation and those maintaining traditional cultures.  Your creativity and energy is needed and wanted to carry out this joyful work.  The meeting will be on Sunday, January 20th at 9:00am at Follow the Buffalo Inc.’s World Headquarters 9429 Marsh Rd., Plainwell MI 49080.

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Announcing the Coyote Life Festival

Follow the Buffalo, Inc. and Healing Lifeways are joining to sponsor and host the first Coyote Life Festival in Comins, Michigan on the weekend of February 22-24, 2013.

The Coyote Life Festival is a celebration of life, love, and laughter in the traditional “coyote spirit”.  There will be plenty of fun, food, games, drumming, singing, storytelling, sharing, and thanksgiving.

Tentative Schedule

Friday

  • Arrive 5-8 pm – meet, mix, and mingle
  • 8-10 pm – drumming, singing, and bonfire (weather permitting)
  • 10pm – Canupa (pipe) ceremony

Saturday

  • 7:30 am – pancake breakfast
  • Morning – games, crafts, and workshops (TBD)
  • 12pm – soup, sandwich, and potluck lunch
  • Afternoon – games, crafts, outdoor activities (weather permitting), drumming, songs, and stories
  • 5-8pm – chili supper – this will be open to the public and will feature drumming, singing, dancing, contests, and discussion on the theme of celebrating life with gratitude
  • Evening – prayers, discussion, etc.

Sunday

  • 8:30 am – breakfast
  • 10 am – blessing the land, drumming, singing, Canupa (pipe) ceremony
  • 12 pm – lunch, cleanup, and farewell

Additional Information

Cost – We suggest a donation of $40 for the weekend (includes all food and activities).  All proceeds will benefit Follow the Buffalo, Inc.

What to bring – simple food to share on Friday evening and Saturday lunch.

Please contact us for lodging information.

To register or learn more, please email sally@followthebuffalo.org or tim@healinglifeways.org or call Tim at (989)848-5757

Click the link below to download a PDF flyer:

Coyote Life Festival info

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